Life is a Verb

Life is a Verb

Recently I checked Patti Digh’s Life is a Verb as an interlibrary loan and fell in deep, swirly-pop, gushy love with it. You need this book. I need this book. Everyone in the world needs a copy, and if I don’t get one for Christmas (like I asked for—politely, I assure you), I am so buying one the day after Christmas. I’m not normally one to ask for specific items because I truly am happy with whatever someone gives me, if anything at all; I’d much rather just spend time with someone than get a gift (which I’m always telling my sisters, though they only roll their eyes at me). But this book—wow, it just made me make the first Christmas wish list I’ve made in years! And it’s at the tippy tippy top.

I know this book is going to change my life after I’m done with it. I had the same feeling when I started doing Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way, a book program I credit with helping me get over a layoff and get into my freelance career. Though the start of the book—which I’m sure was quite difficult to write—might seem cliché (that’s the biggest complaint I’ve heard about the book) and talks about the death of a loved one inspiring the rest of it, do not let that throw you off. Stick with it and you will soon be rewarded with some of the most amazing, straight to your bones writing that you’ve ever read that will also catapult you into changing your own life.

You see, the full title of the book is Life is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally. Isn’t that the most glorious title ever? And given that the word I picked for 2011 is “Mindfulness” (actually, I picked it for my 28th year; I do goals and such that way rather than the annual way; I find it much more personal), it’s the perfect program for me to complete.

I haven’t read the whole book yet (the lengthy of my library loan wouldn’t have allowed it), but every section I’ve read resonated with me so much. I received goose bumps multiple times. The warm and inviting (yet modern and creative, much like an art journal) layout of the book makes it one you want to take with you and openly read wherever you go, sharing it with anyone curious about it (which I did). Digh reminds us on every page that life is meant to be lived and enjoyed—messily, heartily, rapturously, merrily—every single day. Then she gives us the tools to do just that by exploring our own selves and taking challenges to truly be mindful and intentional. Just knowing that after this book I have a couple of others by Digh to explore makes me swing my shoulders in a happy dance. I’m ready for this adventure!